Thursday, 11 August 2016

Traffic Lights

Ok, one of my quirks is I think the programming exercise of programming simulated traffic lights is fun and interesting! Here are two examples; the first in Scratch and the second using a BBC Micro:bit and GlowBugs (programmable LEDs).



All views are those of the author and should not be seen as the views of any organisation the author is associated with.

Wednesday, 6 July 2016

Review of a Problems-First Approach to Programming

Review of a Problems-First Approach to First Year Undergraduate Programming - Springer



Gary J. Hill   


Published in Software Engineering Education Going Agile Part of the series Progress in IS pp 73-80






DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-29166-6_11


This paper, predominantly discusses the teaching of programming and problem solving to undergraduate first year computing students, using robots/robot simulators and visual programming to emulate the robot tasks. The needs to focus initial programming education on problem solving, prior to the teaching of programming syntax and software design methodology is also considered. The main vehicle for this approach is a robot/robot simulation programmed in Java, followed by the programming of a visual representation/simulation to develop programming skills.



References



  1. 1.
    Beaumont, C., and Fox, C.: Learning programming: Enhancing quality through problem-based learning. In: Proceeding of 4th Annual Conference of the subject centre for Information and Computer Sciences of the Higher Education Academy (pp. 90-95). Newtownabbey, Northern Ireland: Higher Education Academy (2003).
  2. 2.
    Hill G. J., Turner S.: Chapter 7:​ Problems First. In: Software Industry-Oriented Education Practices and Curriculum Development: Experiences and Lessons, M Hussey, X Xu & B Wu (Eds.), IGI Global, USA, pp 110-126, ISBN: 978-1-60960-797-5 (2011).
  3. 3.
    Hill, G., Turner, S. J.: Problems first, second and third. In: International Journal of Quality Assurance in Engineering and Technology Education (IJQAETE). 3(3), pp. 88-109. 2155-496X (2014).
  4. 4.
    Williams, A. B.: The qualitative impact of using Lego Mindstorms robot to teach computer engineering. In: Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineering (IEEE) Transactions on Education, 46, 206 (2003).
  5. 5.
    Štuikys, V., Burbaitė, R., Damaševičius, R.: Teaching of Computer Science Topics Using Meta-Programming-Based GLOs and LEGO Robots. In: Informatics in Education - An International Journal (Vol12_1), pp125-142 (2013).
  6. 6.
    Kariyawasam, K., A., Turner, S., Hill, G.: Is it Visual? The importance of a Problem Solving Module within a Computing course. In: Computer Education, Volume 10, Issue 166, May 2012, pp. 5-7, ISSN: 1672-5913 (2012).
  7. 7.
    HEA-ICS Development Fund: HEA-ICS Development Fund [online] Available from: http://​www.​ics.​heacademy.​ac.​uk/​projects/​development-fund/​index.​php[Accessed: February 2015] (2015).
  8. 8.
    HEA-ICS/Microsoft Innovative Teaching Fund: Developing problem-solving teaching materials based upon Microsoft Robotics Studio [online] Available from: http://​www.​ics.​heacademy.​ac.​uk/​projects/​development-fund/​fund_​details.​php?​id =​ 88 [Accessed February 2015] (2015).
  9. 9.
    Adams, J. P., & Turner, S. J.: Problem Solving and Creativity for Undergraduate Engineers: process or product? In: International Conference on Innovation, Good Practice and Research in Engineering Education July 14-16, 2008, Loughborough, England, Higher Education Academy. 9781904804659 (2008).
  10. 10.
    Adams, J., Turner, S., Kaczmarczyk, S., Picton, P., & Demian, P.: Problem solving and creativity for undergraduate engineers: Findings of an action research project involving robots. In: International Conference on Engineering Education (ICEE 2008), Budapest, Hungary (2008).
  11. 11.
    Turner S., Hill G. J.: Robots in Problem-Solving and Programming. In: 8th Annual Conference of the Subject Centre for Information and Computer Sciences, University of Southampton, 28th - 30th August 2007, pp 82-85 ISBN 0-978-0-9552005-7-1 (2007).
  12. 12.
    Gallopoulos, E., Houstis, E., Rice, J. R.: Computer as Thinker/Doer. In: Problem-Solving Environments for Computational Science, IEEE Computational Science and Engineering pp 11-23 (1994).
  13. 13.
    Houghton, W.: How can Learning and Teaching Theory assist Engineering Academics? [online] School of Engineering - University of Exeter. Available from: https://​www.​heacademy.​ac.​uk/​sites/​default/​files/​learning-teaching-theory.​pdf [Accessed: November 2015] (2004).
  14. 14.
    Bloom, B. S. (Ed.): Taxonomy of educational objectives. In: Handbook I: Cognitive domain. White Plains, NY: Longman (1956).
  15. 15.
    JICC5: Java & the Internet in the Computing Curriculum, Higher Education Academy (HEA) – Information and Computer Sciences (ICS) Conference, South Bank University, London, 22nd Jan, [online] Available from: http://​www.​ics.​heacademy.​ac.​uk/​events/​displayevent.​php?​id=​127[Accessed: February 2015] (2001).
  16. 16.
    Computing Curricula: IEEE CS, ACM Joint Task Force on Computing Curricula, IEEE Computer Society Press and ACM Press. [online] Available from http://​www.​acm.​org/​education/​curricula.​html [Accessed: February, 2015] (2001).
  17. 17.
    Koulouri, T., Lauria, S., Macredie, R., D.: Teaching introductory programming: A quantitative evaluation of different approaches. In: ACM Trans. Comput. Educ. 14, 4, Article 26 (December 2014), 28 pages, DOI: http://​dx.​doi.​org/​10.​1145/​2662412 (2014).
  18. 18.
    Turner S., Hill G. J.: The Inclusion of Robots Within The Teaching OF Problem Solving: Preliminary Results. In: 7th Annual Conference of the ICS HE Academy, Trinity College, Dublin, 29th - 31st August 2006, Proceedings pg 241-242 ISBN 0-9552005-3-9 (2006).
  19. 19.
    Turner S., Hill G. J.: Robots within the teaching of Problem-Solving. In: ITALICS, HEA-ICS, Volume 7 Issue 1, June 2008, pp. 108-119, ISSN: 1473-7507 (2008).
  20. 20.
    Turner S., Hill G. J.: Innovative Use of Robots and Graphical Programming in Software Education. In: Computer Education, Volume 9, May 2010, pp. 54-6, ISSN: 1672-5913 (2010).
  21. 21.
    Turner S, Hill G, Adams: Robots in problem solving in programming. In: 9th 1-day Teaching of Programming Workshop, University of Bath, 6th April 2009 (2009).
  22. 22.
    Gold. N.: Motivating Students in Software Engineering Group Projects: An Experience Report. In: Innovation in Teaching and Learning in Information and Computer Sciences 9(1), 10-19. DOI: 10.11120/ital.2010.09010010 (2010).
  23. 23.
    Greenfoot: Teach and Learn Java Programming. [online] Available from http://​www.​greenfoot.​org/​ [Accessed: February 1, 2015] (2015).
  24. 24.
    Microsoft: Microsoft robotics studio [online] Available from: http://​msdn2.​microsoft.​com/​en-us/​robotics/​aa731520.​aspx [Accessed: February 2015] (2006).
  25. 25.
    Chickering, A. W., Gamson. Z. F.: Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education. In: AAHE Bulletin 39:3-7. ED 282 491.6 pp. MF-01; PC-01 (1987).
  26. 26.
    Savin-Baden, M. & Wilkie, K.: (eds) Challenging Research in Problem-based Learning. Maidenhead: Open University Press/SRHE (2004).


To read more go to: Review of a Problems-First Approach to First Year Undergraduate Programming - Springer


'via Blog this'

Posting on the site does not imply endorsement in any way, by the blog owner or any organisations the blog owner is associated with.


If you'd like to find out more about Computing at the University of Northampton go to: www.computing.northampton.ac.uk. All views and opinions are the author's and do not necessarily reflected those of any organisation they are associated withAll views are those of the author and should not be seen as the views of any organisation the author is associated with.

Monday, 4 July 2016

Enhancing Computing Student Employability Skills Through Partnership Working in STEM Outreach - Springer

Enhancing Computing Student Employability Skills Through Partnership Working in STEM Outreach - Springer:


Scott Turner
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-29166-6_10 or http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-29166-6_10


Published in Software Engineering Education Going Agile Part of the series Progress in IS pp 67-71

Abstract

Student volunteering is growing in the UK and elsewhere, and there is an ongoing debate about whether it is really “self-evidently a ‘good thing’” or there is a greater need for reflection to determine whether this statement is true (Holdsworth and Quinn, Studies in Higher Education35(1), 113–127, 2010). This paper presents a personal reflection of Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) volunteering as a potential route to increasing Computing student’s employability.


References








  • 1.
    STEMNet (2015) Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Network [online] Available at: http://​www.​stemnet.​org.​uk/​ Accessed on: 24thJanuary 2015









  • 2.
    Sinclair J, Allen A, Davis L, Goodchild T, Messenger J, Turner S (2014) "Enhancing student employability skills through partnership working in STEM outreach; the University of Northampton approach " HEA STEM Annual Teaching and Learning Conference 2013: Enhancing the STEM Student Journey, University of Edinburgh, 30th April-1st May 2014









  • 3.
    Holdsworth, C., & Quinn, J. (2010). Student volunteering in English higher education. Studies in Higher Education35(1), 113–127.CrossRef









  • 4.
    Brewis, G., Russell, J., & Holdsworth, C. (2010). Bursting the bubble: Students, volunteering and the community. Research Summary.









  • 5.
    Junkbots (2015) Junkbots [online] Available at: http://​junkbots.​blogspot.​co.​uk/​ Accessed on: 24th January 2015.



  • 'via Blog this'

    Posting on the site does not imply endorsement in any way, by the blog owner or any organisations the blog owner is associated with.

    All views are those of the author and should not be seen as the views of any organisation the author is associated with.

    Monday, 30 May 2016

    10 lines of code challenge - my examples

    The 10 lines of code initiative is a challenge to write code with only ten lines of code to encourage efficient coding, whilst still having fun - the choice of language is up to you. The video from amazingict.co.uk outlines the idea:






    Here are a three simple Scratch projects only using 10 lines of code - very happy for someone to take and  improve them, especially if you comment and share your results. Click on the Green Flags below to see them in action.


     
    The code is available at https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/111834277/



     
    The code is available at https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/110952076/




     
    The code is available at https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/111835204/



    All views are those of the author and should not be seen as the views of any organisation the author is associated with.

    Wednesday, 23 March 2016

    Rise of Rabbitsapien

    A little more detail on my experience of PiCademy December 2015 and the project a few of us developed - RabbitSapien.


    To have a go, you may have to have the following:


    Rise of Rabbitsapien - A team of us put together a project of a robot with a rabbit (no other soft toys were available) with a Passive IR sensor in its belly; that carries out a set routine when movement is detected. All control by a Raspberry Pi via an Pimoroni Explorerhat.




    It was also great to come away with some many resources both physical and activities. Thank you to the Pi Foundation for such a good experience.



     All opinions in this blog are the Author's and should not in any way be seen as reflecting the views of any organisation the Author has any association with.All views are those of the author and should not be seen as the views of any organisation the author is associated with.

    Sunday, 20 March 2016

    Dark in Sonic Pi



    I am not a musician but I do love playing/coding (not difference really) Sonic Pi and video (using Voila http://www.globaldelight.com/voila/index.php) so I came up with this, it was just fun to do. 

    Please someone take it and improve it.

    use_synth :prophet
    in_thread do
      loop do
        sample  :ambi_choir, rate: 0.1, attack: 4, release: 4
        sleep 10
      end
    end
    in_thread do
      loop do
        sample :bass_trance_c, amp: 0.75, release: 3
        sleep 2
        sample :bass_trance_c, rate: 0.5, amp: 0.5, release: 5
        sleep 4
        sample :bass_trance_c, rate: 0.3, amp: 0.25, release: 9
        sleep 10
      end
    end
    sleep 4
    sample :ambi_drone, amp: 0.75, release: 3
    sleep 8
    sample :ambi_dark_woosh, amp: 0.75, release: 3
    sleep 7
    sample :ambi_dark_woosh, amp: 3, release: 6
    sleep 6
    sample :ambi_dark_woosh, amp: 3, release: 5
    sleep 5
    sample :ambi_dark_woosh, amp: 5, release: 4
    sleep 4
    sample :ambi_dark_woosh, amp: 5, release: 3
    sleep 3
    sample :ambi_dark_woosh, amp: 5, release: 2
    sleep 2
    sample :ambi_dark_woosh, amp: 5, release: 1
    sleep 1
    sample :ambi_dark_woosh, amp: 5, release: 0.5
    sleep 0.5
    sample :ambi_dark_woosh, amp: 5, release: 0.5



    Creative Commons License
    Dark by Scott Turner is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.


    All opinions in this blog are the Author's and should not in any way be seen as reflecting the views of any organisation the Author has any association with.

    Saturday, 12 March 2016

    3 'Art' Scratch Projects





    Grid painting - Simple system that allows images made up on 8 x 8 grid. Click on the Green flag to start. For the code go to: https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/101415120/


    Whirleygig 1 - straight random lines. Click on the Green flag to start. Foe the code go to: https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/99053538/


    Whirleygig 2 - random lines. Click on the Green flag to start. For the code go to: https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/100924783/



    The last two are loosely based on the idea of Generative Art. A good book, in my view, on this is available from Amazon at Generative Art


     All views are those of the author and should not be seen as the views of any organisation the author is associated with.